November 2012

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011 data on homelessness released

2019-01-24T14:48:53+00:00November 13th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

A report issued by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on November 12 has found that between census nights in 2006 and 2011, there was an increase in the homelessness rate by 8% across Australia. As at 2011, there were estimated to be 105,237 homeless people in Australia. Most of the increase in homelessness between 2006 and 2011 was attributable to people living in severely crowded dwellings: an increase of 31% for Australia. There was also a marked rise in the

October 2012

ACOSS report identifies housing costs as significant contributor to poverty

2019-01-24T14:48:53+00:00October 16th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

A report released on 14 October 2012 by the Australian Council of Social Service to mark Anti-Poverty Week has found that in 2010, after taking account of housing costs, 12.8% of Australians live in poverty: that is, one in eight people were living at or below the poverty line in 2010. The ‘Poverty in Australia’ report found that the overall risk of poverty is higher in New South Wales and Tasmania than in the other states — this may reflect

TAAS services saved by federal minister

2019-05-21T12:41:08+00:00October 3rd, 2012|Media Releases, Media Releases, Meeting Housing Needs, News|

National Shelter media release — 3 October 2012

National Shelter congratulates the federal government for providing 3.3 million dollars to enable the Tenants’ Advice and Advocacy Service to continue in Queensland.

In a statement today the Gillard Government announced they will provide emergency funding for the Queensland TAAS until June 2013.

The tenants’ services would otherwise have closed this month, after their funding had been cut by the state government in July.

Chairperson of National Shelter, Adrian Pisarski, is pleased to see the federal

September 2012

Domestic violence the most common reason for seeking homelessness assistance

2019-01-24T14:48:54+00:00September 25th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

 

On 24 September 2012, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare issued its latest report on data from specialist homelessness services. In the March quarter 2012, 18,594 people were accommodated by homelessness services across Australia on average every night, and domestic and family violence was the most common main reason for seeking assistance (in 24% of cases). Read the AIHW report.

Australian Bureau of Statistics revises 2001 and 2006 estimates of homelessness

2019-01-24T14:48:54+00:00September 13th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

On September 11, the Australian Bureau of Statistics issued revised estimates of the levels of homelessness based on 2001 and 2006 census data: 95,314 homeless people in Australia in 2001, and 89,728 homeless people in Australia in 2006. The ABS has stated that the decline in the number of people living in boarding houses drove the overall decline in homelessness between 2001 and 2006. The ABS has stated the some key population groups — young people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Report on barriers to housing supply released

2019-01-24T14:48:55+00:00September 4th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

On August 30, the Housing Supply and Affordability Reform Working Party released a report on strategies to stimulate housing supply — covering issues such as land supply, infrastructure cost recovery, and land-use planning and approval processes. The report acknowledged, however, that reducing barriers to housing supply will not necessarily reduce the housing affordability problems faced by households on lower incomes. Regarding the First Home Owner Grant, the report noted that in its current form and in a supply-constrained environment, the

Australian Bureau of Statistics issues a report on their definition of homelessness

2019-01-24T14:48:53+00:00September 4th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

On September 4, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) released a report on their statistical definition of homelessness. This report states that a person is considered homeless if they do not have suitable accommodation alternatives, and their current living arrangement:

  • is in a dwelling that is inadequate; or
  • has no tenure, or if their initial tenure is short and not extendable; or
  • does not allow them to have control of, and access to space for social relations.

The new definition has been developed following

August 2012

Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program grants available

2019-01-24T14:48:53+00:00August 22nd, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

New Commonwealth funding is available to help older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in outer regional, remote and very remote areas of Australia. Applications for funding under the Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged Program (ACHA) close on September 21. The ACHA program supports older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, through linking them with housing and care services. Read about the

National social housing survey indicates tenant satisfaction

2019-01-24T14:48:55+00:00August 15th, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, News, News|

On August 6, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare released the 2010 state and territory results from the ‘National social housing survey’. The report states that 79% of community housing tenants were satisfied with the services provided by their housing provider, and 73% of public housing tenants were so satisfied. Read the report.

Submission on Exposure Draft Homelessness Bill 2012

2019-05-21T13:04:14+00:00August 3rd, 2012|Meeting Housing Needs, Meeting Housing Needs, Publications, Submissions, Submissions, Submissions|

3 August 2012

In our submission on the Exposure Draft Homelessness Bill 2012, we called for a right to adequate housing under Australian law  — we think that the relevant commitments made in the international conventions listed in the Exposure Draft Bill should be transformed into rights created by legislation that can by asserted by citizens under Australian law. Our submission also covered issues such as the recognition of the specific needs and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people